Managing intoxicated patients

While working with populations who use substances, psychologists may encounter patients who are intoxicated. In these situations, a variety of ethical and legal issues may arise, and often take precedence over direct clinical service. The purpose of this brief article is to provide some initial education as well as an overview of several common situations […]

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  • Psychogastroenterology replete with opportunities

    For the past 20 years, the role of the clinical psychologist in the management of chronic digestive disease has evolved into the newly recognized field of psychogastroenterology. Like other specialties within behavioral medicine, psychogastroenterology focuses on the intersection of chronic medical diseases impacting the digestive system and their subsequent social and emotional impacts. Research into […]

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  • Challenge ‘diet mentality’ to treat binge eating

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most common eating disorder among adults in the United States. More than 8 percent of American adults meet some or all of the criteria for binge eating disorder at some point in their life, more than all other eating disorders combined. Despite the need for effective treatment, binge eating […]

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  • Exposure therapy is fast and effective

    When I first heard about exposure therapy I was early in my graduate career sitting on a bench with a professional mentor who told me that her son had a needle phobia and was in treatment to reduce his fear so that he could be vaccinated. She described the therapist showing pictures and watching videos […]

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  • Empathy may be ill-timed in treating trauma

    Under-recognized in the treatment of trauma is the negative impact that may result when an offer of compassion or empathy is ill-timed. Children, now adults, often continue to adhere to entrenched allegiances of accommodating parental caregivers – pathological states which long served to negate the unique existence of that child as an evolving individual. A […]

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  • Managing risks of telepsychology

    Many psychologists are eager to use technology to enhance their practices, and the field of telepsychology is quickly gaining popularity. Clients and providers alike often value the convenience of using videoconferencing technology for the provision of mental health services, but as with all emerging interventions, there can be risks. This article will provide a brief […]

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  • Special considerations needed when working with first responders

    First responders and their families make up a unique subculture. Therapists have heard countless stories of their difficulties finding competent treatment. Police and fire responders report that they often overcome a reluctance to seek treatment only to be met with a provider who understands little about their work and has difficulty handling their trauma. Psychologists […]

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  • Using CQ (couple intelligence) in couples counseling

    In The Analytic Attitude, Roy Shaefer, Ph.D., reminded us that the therapist’s flaunting of intelligence with patients can be distancing, if not anti-therapeutic. Interpersonal relational models of psychotherapy, psychoanalysis and counseling, have elevated the role of authenticity over intellect. Might the principle of “relating” rather than “impressing” also apply to the intimate partner milieu? At […]

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  • Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT): Helpful hints

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) assumes psychological problems are caused by negative thoughts and behavior that influence feelings. We can help clients with a few suggestions on how to change what they are doing when distressed rather than to focus solely on what they are thinking. Here are some actions a psychologist can instruct a client […]

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  • Out-of-office encounters may be beneficial

    Engaging with clients outside the office has generally been discouraged or called unethical, similar to the way in which uninformed risk management and ethics “experts” have traditionally viewed dual relationships, bartering, self-disclosure by therapists or gift exchange between clients and therapists. Once we go beyond the “don’t list” and take off distorted “risk management glasses” […]

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